Pork & Roasted Vegetables

The preparation time for this dish is 5 minutes. The easiest dish to prepare and then into the oven for 1-1 1/2 hours. Read a book, watch a great movie, get office or house work done while your oven does the work!

Choosing a Pork or Beef Roast.  Allow for water loss when working with meat, measure 5 ounces per person.

Serving 6, 30 ounces or buy a 2 lb pork roast (900 g, round up to 1 Kilo of meat).

INGREDIENTS

3 onions peeled and quartered (Red or Yellow)
Do Not peel following vegetables to optimize flavor of dish.

  • 4-6 Red Potatoes washed and quartered
  • 4 Carrots quartered
  • 3 Zucchini’s quartered and lightly salted (removes bitterness)
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • 1 teaspoon Turmeric
  • 2  Garlic Cloves (peeled and minced)
  • 1/4 c. Olive Oil

Pork or Beef Roast (washed and patted dry with paper towels)

  • 1 tsp each Salt
  • 1 tsp dried Sage( or 1 Tbsp freshly chopped) .
  • 1/4 tsp Black Pepper
  • 3-4 Rosemary Sprigs
  • 1 1/2 c. Water
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce for Pork Roast
  • 1 cup red wine for Beef Roast
  • 1 Tbsp vegetable oil

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 450 F (232 C).

In an oven safe dish place washed and quartered vegetables. With a large spoon turn 1/2 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp pepper, 1 tsp turmeric, rosemary springs, garlic, olive oil into vegetables until they are well coated. Place into oven set at 450 F.

Place skillet on medium high heat for 1 minute and then add 1 Tbsp vegetable oil.  Add meat to skillet and sear each side for about 2 minutes. The meat is ready to turn when is easily releases itself from pan. (Don’t fight to detach! The meat will detach itself once completely seared on one side.)

Rub seasonings onto Pork poast

In a bowl, mix 3/4 tsp, salt and 1/2 tsp pepper, 3/4 tsp sage. Rub seasonings onto all sides of roast. (Use all theseasoning!) In a roasting pan, rest 4 rosemary sprigs about 3-5 inches in length on bottom of pan, place pork, or beef roast on top.  Add water, soy sauce (or wine). Cover pan with aluminum foil and seal edges.

Leaving vegetables in the oven to continue baking. Reduce oven temperature to 325F (150C) when placing roast in the oven and bake roast  for 20 minutes per pound (450 grams). Internal temp. will reach 160 F or 72 C. Using oven gloves, carefully remove pan from oven and place onto a pot pad. Keep covered and allow roast to rest for 10 minutes. With a large meat fork and butcher knife thinly slice meat. Remove vegetables from oven and with large spoon, gently place vegetables around meat for presentation. Buon Appetito!

Bolognese

Original meat sauce from Bologna can be served on any pasta of choice served with Parmesan Cheese!

Can be used in Lasagna!

Original Recipe from Bologna, Italy

2 Carrot’s diced
2 Celery stalks diced
1 Onion diced
1/4 cup Olive Oil
1 pound ground meat
1/2 cup red wine (optional)
2 28 ounces tomato sauce (unseasoned)
1/2 cup milk
1 cup water
1 1/2 tsp salt

In a separate large pan combine vegetables, meat and oil and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, using a wooden spoon to break to pieces the

Sofritto! The base for Bolognese and Lasagna Recipes

ground beef and to combine with vegetables. Add wine and cover for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to Medium low, add sauce, milk, water and salt, cover with pan lid slightly tilted for vapor to escape. Allow to simmer for 20-30 minutes. Add basil leaves allow to cook another 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

 

Serve with favorite pasta and top with Parmesan Cheese!

Consider using this recipe in Lasagna recipes. Add 1 extra 28 oz (700 ml) of sauce for a count of 3 + 1 cup of water!

Lasagna Recipes in Eat Know How

Lasagna & Meatballs   http://eatknowhow.com/2011/03/05/lasagna-with-meatballs/

Southern Italian Lasagna  http://eatknowhow.com/2010/03/17/southern-italian-or-tuscan-lasagna/

Simple Lasagna (meatless) http://eatknowhow.com/2010/11/03/simple-lasagna/

Vegetarian Lasagna (meatless)   http://eatknowhow.com/2011/03/05/vegetarian-lasagna/

List of Cholesterol and Triglyceride Reducing Foods

Must Read: Triglycerides, How They Are Influenced”  and Calculate Cholesterol, Choose TLC Menu Plan”  both articles provide a better over view of how to confront cholesterol and achieve reduced total cholesterol.

Choose your foods wisely to improve your daily nutritional intake, and cleanse your body, optimizing it’s overall function in keeping you healthy. Highlighted words will take you to healthy recipes.

Various foods, beverages and spices are known for reducing, or interfering with bad cholesterol (LDL) and carrying it out of the body.

  •  Fruits and Vegetables (totaling 9 per day)
  • Teas 2-4 cups a day
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil 2 -3 Tablespoons
  • Cinnamon:  1-4g (1/3 tsp – 1 1/2 tsp a day)
  • Ginger (250 mcg/day capsule form)
  • Honey 3 1/2 tablespoons / day

Maybe applied to any Meal Plan of choice.   Before doing your grocery shopping choose five foods from each catagory to buy and put in your refrigerator…………………

FRUITS choose 4 for daily consumption.

  • Apples, 1/2 cup
  • Apricots: Dried, cooked, unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Banana, raw 1 medium
  • Cantaloupe, raw About 1/2 cup diced
  • Grapefruit juice 3/4 cup. If taking statins avoid grapefruit.
  •  Honeydew, Cantaloupe & Watermelon 3/4 cup
  • Nectarine, raw 1 medium
  • Orange juice 6 ounces 
  • Peaches: Dried, Cooked, Unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Pears: Dried, uncooked 1/2 cup
  • Pomegranate,  1 medium
  • Prunes, dried, cooked, unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Prune juice, unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Raisins 1/4 cup
  • VEGETABLES choose 5 for daily consumption. Click on for recipe.
  • Artichoke recipe,or Risotto with Artichokes globe (french), cooked 1 medium
  • Asparagus, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Beans: Green, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Avocado, 1/4 cup
  • Cauliflower  cooked 1/2 cup
  • Chard cooked 1/2 cup
  • Corn cooked 1/2 cup
  • Eggplant cooked 1/2 cup
  • Legumes cooked 1/2 cup
  • Mushrooms cooked 1/2 cup
  • Parsnips cooked 1/2 cup
  • Peas, green cooked 1/2 cup
  • Plantain  1 medium
  • Potato: Baked or boiled, with or w/o skin 1 medium
  • Pumpkin, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Rutabaga, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Spinach, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Squash, winter, cooked, mashed 1/2 cup
  • Sweet-potato: Baked 1 medium or Boiled 1 medium
  • Tomatoes: Raw 1 med., Stewed 1/2 c., Tomato juice, canned 3/4 c. 
  • Zucchini: saute` 1/2 cup

Red Meat, Pork and Poultry 3 ounces should be consumed in reduced amounts. If individual has  high Triglycerides Pork may be eliminated from the diet completely.

Laura’s Meat is a nice lean meat that will be beneficial to reducing LDL while obtaining protein. Purchase the 92% lean red meat.

  • Meat and Poultry Beef: lean only once day for a weight of 3 ounces
  • Ground Meat; extra lean, lean, or regular; baked or broiled 1 patty
  • Pot roast, braised, lean only 3 ounces
  • Roast, rib, roasted, lean only 3 ounces
  • Short-ribs, braised, lean only 3 ounces
  • Steak, lean only: Baked or broiled 3 ounces + Braised 3 ounces
  • Stew meat, simmered, lean only 3 ounces
  • Chicken, without skin: Breast, broiled or roasted 1/2 breast
  • Chicken Leg (thigh and drumstick), broiled or roasted 1 leg
  • Cornish hen, roasted, without skin 1/2 hen
  • Ham, roasted, lean only: Fresh, Smoked or cured 3 ounces
  • Lamb, lean only: Chop, shoulder; baked, braised, or broiled 1 chop Lamb Roast, leg or shoulder, roasted 3 ounces
  • Pork: Chop, baked or broiled, lean only 1 chop
  • Pork Cutlet, baked or broiled, lean only 1 cutlet
  • Pork Roast, roasted, lean only: Loin 3 ounces
  • Pork Shoulder 3 ounces
  • Turkey, light or dark meat, roasted, without skin 3 ounces
  • Veal, lean only: Chop, braised 1 chop Cutlet or steak, pan broiled 1 cutlet, Roast, leg, roasted 3 ounces

FISH 3 ounces. All Fish should be checked for dietary cholesterol;  most shellfish can be high in cholesterol and limited in consumption. 

  • Carp, catfish, flounder, or mullet; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Haddock, Mackerel, or Porgy; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Clams: Canned, Steamed, poached 3 ounces
  • Cod, Croaker, Pompano, or Trout; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Crabmeat, steamed 3 ounces
  • Lobster, steamed or boiled 3 ounces
  • Mussels, steamed, boiled, or poached 3 ounces
  • Ocean Perch, Pike; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Oysters: Canned, undrained 3 ounces
  • Sea Bass, or Whiting; baked, boiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Salmon: Baked, broiledgilled, smoked 3 ounces
  • Scallops: Baked, broiled, grilled, steamed 3 ounces
  • Swordfish steak, baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Tuna, canned, baked, seared, grilled 3 ounces

Legumes (Meat Alternate) 1 cup cooked is loaded with fiber and protein which will assist in eliminating LDL cholesterol.

  • Dry Beans, Peas, and Lentils Beans, cooked: Bayo, black, brown, or red kidney 1/2 c
  • Calico, chickpeas (garbanzo beans), mung, or pinto 1/2 cup
  • Fava, Lima, soybeans, or white 1/2 cup
  • Lentils, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Peas, split, green or yellow, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Soy milk 1 cup

MILK, CHEESE, AND YOGURT should be monitored carefully, or eliminated from the diet while reducing Triglyceride levels. 

  • Parmesean Cheese 1 oz
  • Milk 1% or skim
  • Chocolate skim milk 1 cup
  • Lowfat / non fat cheese 1 oz
  • Milk-based fruit drinks 1 c
  • Yogurt: Flavored, made with lowfat milk 6 ounces
  • Frozen Yogurt 6 ounces,
  • Frozen Fruit Yogurt made with lowfat or nonfat milk 6 ounces

Diverticulitis and Diverticulosis Diet Tips

 
Diverticula are small pouches in the wall of the digestive tract. They occur when the inner layer of the digestive tract bulges through weak spots in the outer layer. (This is similar to what happens when an inner tube bulges through a tire.) People who have these pouches are said to have diverticulosis. Sometimes one or more of these pouches becomes inflamed or infected, a condition called diverticulitis. Some people with diverticulosis become aware of the condition only when diverticulitis occurs.
Diverticulosis is a very common condition in the United States.
Diverticulosis is more common in developed or industrialized countries, such as the United States, England, and Australia, where the typical diet is low in fiber and high in highly processed carbohydrates, diverticulosis is common. Diverticulosis first appeared in the United States in about 1900. This was the same time that processed foods were first introduced into the US diet.
Diverticulosis is much less common in countries of Asia and Africa, where the typical diet is high in fiber. (For more information on diverticulitis, check with the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diverticulitis-diet/HQ00548)

Most people recover from diverticulitis without problems if they receive appropriate treatment. Diverticulosis and diverticulitis can be prevented by changes in lifestyle and habits.

Diverticulosis is thought to be caused by increased pressure on the intestinal wall from inside the intestine. As the body ages, the outer layer of the intestinal wall thickens. This causes the open space inside the intestine to narrow. Stool (feces) moves more slowly through the colon, increasing the pressure. Hard stools, such as those produced by a diet low in fiber or slower stool “transit time” through the colon, can further increase pressure. Frequent, repeated straining during bowel movements also increases pressure and contributes to formation of diverticula.
Diverticulosis in developed countries is blamed largely on the typical diet, which is low in fiber. For more information on Diverticulosis.

Diet Plan for Diverticulitis

  1. Grains
    enriched refined white bread, buns, bagels, english muffins
    plain cereals e.g. Cheerios, Cornflakes, Cream of Wheat, Rice Krispies, Special K
    arrowroot cookies, tea biscuits, soda crackers, plain melba toast
    white rice, refined pasta and noodles
    avoid whole grains as the seeds can get add to the inflammation within the intestine.
  2. Fruits:
    fruit juices except prune juice
    applesauce, apricots, banana (1/2), cantaloupe, canned fruit cocktail, grapes, honeydew melon, peaches, watermelon
    avoid raw and dried fruits, raisins and berries.
  3. Vegetables:
    Vegetable Juices
    Potatoes no skin
    beets, green/yellow beans, carrots, celery, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, mushrooms, green/red peppers, potatoes (peeled), squash, zucchini
    avoid vegetables from the cruciferous family such as broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, Swiss chard etc
  4. Meat and Protein Choice:
    Well done, tender meat (lean), fish (wild caught) high in Omega 3 which will reduce inflammation within intestine. eggs
    Avoid beans & lentils
    Avoid all nuts and seeds, as well as foods that may contain seeds (such as yogurt)
  5. Dairy
    Two servings per day skim or 1% milk
  6. FATS
    Avoid saturated fats such as butter, margarine, Trans Fats, mealt high in fat content.
    MCT oil is most gentle on the intestine. You can also try plant oils. Extra Virgin Olive Oil, canola, avocado and peanut oils.

By: K. Crocker

Low Sodium Rubs, Marinades and Glaze

 Great for Grilling and Barbecuing Meats and Poultry 

Cajun Spice Rub

2 Tbsp Paprika, 1 Tbsp ground Cumin, 1 Tsbp dried Thyme, 4 mined garlic cloves, 1 diced onion, 1 Tbsp dired Oregano1 tsp black pepper, 1 tsp Gound Cayenne

Allspice, Garlic, Marjoram, Parsley ,Thyme   • Mix 1 tsp of each and rub into any any red meat.

Marjoram, Rosemary, Tarragon, Lemon Zest    • Combining 1 tsp of each spice and the zest of half of lemon rub into the chicken or turkey.

Cayene, Gound Cumin, Garlic to spice up your meats.  Mix together1 Tbsp Cumin, 1 tsp Cayene, 2 minced Garlic  and rub into meat.

Marinades

Soy Sauce, Garlic, Olive Oil, Balsalmic Vinegar Great for Pork!

2 Tbsp Reduced Sodium Soy Sauce,

2 minced garlic

1 Tbsp Olive Oil,

3 Tbsp Balsalmic Vinegar.

Place meat inside 1 gallon plastic bag and let marinade for two hours. May store in refrigerator for up to three days.

Basic Wine Marinade

1/4 (60 ml) cup olive oil,

1/4 (60 ml) Red Wine (RED MEATS) and White Wine (WHITE MEATS),

1 onion grated,

2 garlic cloves minced,

1 tbsp herbs (oregano, rosemary, marjoram, or bay leaf, or Italian Seasoning),

1 tsp pepper,

and 1/4 tsp salt.

Combine all ingredients with meat into a 1 gallon plastic bag.  Allow to marinade for 2-4 hours and up to 48 hours.

Glaze

Rum Glaze

1/2 cup (100g) brown sugar

2 Tbsp dark rum

grated zest of 1 lime

Juice of 1 lime

1 Tbsp dry mustard

Mix all ingredients together.

Coat meat with a Dry Rub of your choice. Cook over low heat. Brush on glaze at end of cooking time.

Mango Mustard Glaze

2 1/2 tbsp mango chutney

1 1/2 tbsp Dijon mustard

1 1/2 tbsp apricot jam

3 -5 drops Tabasco Sauce

Mix all ingredients together then brush over cooked meat.  Return to grill and continue cooking for 15-20 minutes make sure that it glazes, but does not burn.

By Kimberly Crocker

Animal Fat…To Eat or Not to Eat

The danger of a high Protein diet, which is commonly linked to a high animal fat diet seems to be up for discussion again during January, the month of the diet!

While a small amount of animal fat can be found in ones diet beef, chicken, fish and poultry should be consumed in the amount of 4 oz /day (114g a day).  Eating a deit high in animal fat is dangerous, a.ka. Saturated Fat and is the culprit of high cholesterol. (Unsaturated Fat comes from plant oils and nuts.) Our liver already produces a perfect amount of cholesterol (1g/day) to meet our hormone needs.
A high animal fat diet is dangerous, especially, if there is a lack of fiber and exercise in ones daily routine.  Pathologies such as artherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries due to fat lined within veins and arteries of heart, which block oxygen to the heart, causing a portion of the heart to die.), heart attack, stroke, arthritis, inflammation and kidney failure.

The heart healthy Omega 3,6, found primarily in fish (and walnuts 1 oz or 28g /day) should be consumed 4-6 oz/ day or 114-168g/day three -four times a week. This nutritional fat is a healer in that it is largely responsible for reducing inflammation of all types.

Give yourself permission to enjoy hamburgers, steak, sausage, porkloins and pies, but monitor them carefully in a daily and weekly diet as to curve nutritionally linked diseases.

By: Kimberly Crocker