Salt, Sugar, Fat, Alcohol

Know your numbers, improve your health.

How well do you know: Salt, Sugar, Fat and Alcohol?
All are tasty! Consumption of Salt, Sugar & Alcohol should be enjoyed in moderation.  All three can bring satisfaction and too much can have a negative effect on an individual, promoting health problems.

Salt will lead to hypertension. Reduce your risk of high blood pressure, look for salt that is hidden in: can foods, soy sauce, chicken and meats (injected with saline water), salad dressing, cheese, fast foods, and prepared frozen foods.  Daily recommendation of sodium  consumption is no more than 2.3 grams per day (1/2 teaspoon) and 1.5 grams for those over 51 years old.

Sodium levels reflected in a blood draw should be 135-145 mEq/L. Increased levels are linked to dehydration or renal (kidney) disease. Decreased levels are indicative of heart failure or edema. An individual that suffers from hypertension is strongly encouraged to follow the DASH Diet, designed to promote a low sodium diet and promotes overall wellness.

Sugar as we know and enjoy it! What other forms of sugar do you consume?

Sugar comes in many forms. A few common names are: sucrose (white), fructose (fruits and veggies), lactose (milk) and glucose (fuel for  our body’s energy). Studies of how sugar impacts both individuals and society are being conducted. For now, (within the context of healthy eating) studies show that sugar does not raise blood glucose any more quickly than do other starchy carbohydrates such as potatoes, rice, or pasta. Keep in mind, it is ones best interest to consume fruit, vegetable and grain carbohydrates as the element of fiber (both soluble and insoluble) will stabilize blood glucose levels by ridding the body of what is not important.

  • Fasting glucose normal levels 70-99 mg/dl.
  • Pre-diabetes 100-125 mg/dl.
  • Diabetes  >125 mg/dl.
  • Numbers that are over 125 mg/dl will prompt your doctor to ask you to return on a different day to draw blood a second time to better regulate the glucose levels.
  • Talk with your Doctor, Dietitian, or Diabetes Educator about obtaining optimal glucose levels by following  a balanced meal plan
Oil is a healthy fat that keeps the body well lubricated.

Oil is a healthy fat that keeps the body well lubricated.

Fats, when possible, should be consumed in liquid (unsaturated) form at room temperature. Olive Oil is an example of a healthy fat and lubricant for veins, arteries and organs. The presence of fat assists fat soluble vitamins with digestion and are stored in the liver. 3-4 tablespoons a day will keep the body healthy.

The Meditarranean Diet is an easy lifestyle to follow and allows for an individual to enjoy a wide variety of foods.

Reduced amounts of meats should be consumed 3 times a week, 4 ounces/day. Fish is light, easy to digest and contributes to raising healthy (HDL) cholesterol and lowering lousy (LDL) cholesterol. Enjoy fish 4 times a week! Solid fats (saturated) like cheese and butter should be consumed in lesser amounts of 1 ounce a day for cheese and 2 eight ounce glasses of 1% milk of choice (almond, cow or soy).

Ideal Cholesterol & Triglyceride Numbers
HDL cholesterol 40-60 mg/dl.
LDL cholesterol <100-129 mg/dl
Triglycerides <150 mg/dl

Wine in moderation is good for the body.

Wine in moderation is good for the body.

Alcohol
Alcohol can make your blood sugar levels fall too low and put you at risk of hypoglycemia, so people with diabetes are advised to drink alcohol with a meal or snack and not by itself.
Alcoholic beverages and drink mixers contain sugar and carbohydrates, so they must be figured into your overall meal plan. Your body will burn the alcohol as a source of fuel instead of burning fat.
If you use insulin, limit alcohol to two drinks per day.  Consume alcoholic drinks only with a meal or snack, and do not reduce your usual amount of carbohydrate.

Alcoholism is determined through a blood draw. A quick look at potassium levels maybe an indication of kidney or heart problems. Lower levels or potassium  is also a clue to a problem with alcoholism.  Potassium levels should be 3.6-5 mEq/L.

All our favorite vices can be included in our daily diet. Done in moderation, we can benefit from the joy of having them, but excessive consumption can damage our organs. Monitor your blood draw by requesting a copy of your blood results and know your numbers to stay healthy.

Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio

References
Sugar and Diabetes  http://www.bddiabetes.com/us/main.aspx?cat=1&id=274
Fiber stabilizes blood glucose http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15173415
Reference Range for Blood Draw http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/features/ref-ranges/

Mediterranean Diet Low Sodium Meal Plan

The Mediterranean Diet is high in fruits, vegetables, and lean meats and seafood. The common thread is an abundance of Vitamin E found in many meals. Lastly, socialize and exercise with family and friends to make this a complete Lifestyle Change!

The following sample daily menu is a plan that incorporates both the Mediterranean and “DASH” diets, with the latter focused on reduced sodium intake.  By structuring meals throughout the week improved health will soon be noticed. One change that is noticeable with listed meals is that the calories are loaded in the morning and afternoon, the calories then taper off in the evening.

A key element to the success of this diet is reduced low salt intake in the food preparation. Fluids are equally important for a healthy lifestyle, add 6-8 glasses of water to your daily routine, choosing to squeeze the contents of 1/2 -1 whole lemon to a single  glass of water each day.

Please contact the listed telephone number if you are interested in more information or would like to establish a consultation. kimberlyscardicchio@yahoo.com

Breakfast

  • 1 slice whole wheat toast (I choose Aunt Millies “5 Grain Bread Light”, 2.5 grams fiber/slice.)
  • 1 tbsp Raspberry Jelly
  • Oatmeal (preferably 1 or 5 minute stove top)
  • 1 orange
  • (1.5  breads, 1 grain, 1 fruit)
  • 2 glasses of water (one glass of water with the juice squeezed from a fresh lemon.)

1 glass of water

10:30 am Snack
Chop and Combine

  • 1 Tbsp unsalted nuts  or sunflower seeds
  • 1 (choose 1) apple, plum, pear, peach
  • 1 four ounce low fat yogurt
  • 1 glass water
  • (1 protein, 1 fruit,  1 dairy)

Lunch

  • 2-3 oz fillet of fish, lean meat or poultry with 1/4 tsp salt or Mrs. Dash salt substitute
  • 1 c. ea. sliced carrots / zucchini (sautee 15 min’s with 1/8 c. olive oil. Add minced garlic, parsley)
  • diced 1 potato, 1 pepper, 1 peeled onion season with rosemary, thyme, 1/4 tsp salt, 1/8 c. oil. (Heat on med. for 20 minutes.)
  • 1 glass of wine
  • 1/2 cup grapes
  • (3 vegetable, 1 fruit, 1 protein,  1 fat)
  • 1 glass of water

2:00 pm   Snack

  • 1 Banana, or 1/4 cup berries, or 7 prunes
  • 1 glass of water
  • (1 fruit)

1 glass of water

Dinner

  • 1 cup lettuce
  • 1/2 cup tomato
  • 1 cup VEGETABLE: avocado, beans, sweet potato, or baked potato
  • 4 ounces of fish or chicken
  • 1 ounce of low fat cheese
  • 1-2 tsp Olive Oil and Vinegar
  • Glass of water with lemon
  • 1 Fruit of choice
  • (3 vegetable, 1 fat, 1 dairy, 1 protein, 1 fruit)

2 glasses of  water before bed

Fast Food; Fatty Liver

    How often do you eat “Fast Food in a week’s time?  Is it the best choice, or the easiest way to “Fit A Meal into your day?  Nutrition starts at birth. Life moves forward, “diet” becomes more hectic and evolves from being a way to live, to a way to survive.
     If you are asked to name two questions, routinely raised at any Doctor’s office, most people would correctly respond:
 “Do you drink?”
 “Do you smoke?”
      How often are patients probed to reflect on a daily routine at a yearly check-up with a medical inquiry of, “How many times a week or month do you eat fast food?”  One in five adults are identified with a form of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.  It would stand to reason that if the doctor does not ask the patient about their food intake, the patient should be asking for a analysis of their liver enzymes.
 Recent research studies have proven  “A diet high in FAST FOOD consumption  leads to Liver Disease (Cirrhosis, or Cancer)”.  “Fatty Liver is the most common liver abnormality in children ages 2-9 years old,” revealed in The Office Journal of American Pediatrics      October, 2006.
    Liver disease can only be determined by having liver enzymes evaluated through a blood draw at a yearly check-up. Once diagnosed, recommendation’s will be made and a new dietary routine will be followed by the patient.

      Awareness about the quantity and quality of fast food, saturated with salt and boiling oil,

Fast food leads to Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

slowly kills the liver of adults and children, is the first critical step in re-thinking weekly meal plans  .

     The good news is that a Lifestyle Change improving on:  what is eaten, increased exercise,  avoidance of alcohol and limited sodium intake can return a damaged liver to a healthier state.

Once diagnosed with liver disease, your goal is to help the organ return to it’s normal functions, it’s ability to process everything that you eat and drink. A healthy lifestyle can help you feel your best and help your body cope with it’s disease. By eating


healthy and doing physical activity in moderation you will:

  1. Give your body the energy it needs to work well.
  2. Boost your immune system.
  3. Help your liver renew itself.

                                                         

           Eat Well….Enjoy the Healing Power of Food       Keep your energy level up by eating smaller meals and snacks more often. Organs filled with sodium must be flushed with foods high in Potassium: Sweet Potatoes, Baked Potato; Yogurt; Clams, Halibut; Lima, White and Soy Beans: Prunes, Kiwi, Bananas.

  1. Add, 6-8 glasses of water a day will assist in purifying the body from excess sodium and toxin’s.
  2. Enjoy light to moderate physical activity, such as walking, swimming, gardening
  3. Build up slowly to 30 to 60 minutes of activity, at least 4 times a week.
  4. Avoid food poisoning by storing and preparing foods safely. Wash your hands often.
  5. Talk to your health care provider if depression affects your ability to eat well.

Decrease some of the symptoms and the side effects of any treatments, such as feeling tired and sick by following a healthy diet.

  1. Carbohydrates: Whole grains, fruits and vegetables
  2. Fat: Healthy oils such as: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola oil, Avocado and Smart Balance oils. Omega 3, 6 reduces the inflammation in the liver: Fish, Walnuts, Flaxseed
  3. Protein: Fish (3 x’s / wk), Poultry, Lean Meat

What your body does not need 
1. Avoid alcohol.
2. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Trans Fat must be 0 grams.
3. No more pretzels , chips, popcorn, french fries, cheese, certain meats, soy sauce and Avoid Sports Drinks. Salt, canned and processed foods must be limited.

Tasty fast food can happen in your own kitchen! After reflecting on the latest research consider preparing any of these healthy 7 Easy Recipes under 7 minutes!

Keep in communication with your doctor and dietitian so that neccessary adjustments can be made accordingly to your diet and physical activity plans.

By: K. Crocker

Literature Research
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/4/1388
http://organtransplant.mc.duke.edu/PDFs/Liver_Pre_3.pdf
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17006918&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17047295&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://magazine.wustl.edu/Winter05/SamuelKlein.htm

Herb’s & Spice’s to Replace the Salt Shaker

…. After all, “variety is the spice of life”.

Add chopped basil to flavor vegetable dishes

Freshly grown and cut herbs placed in a vase filled with water adds beauty and a wonderful scent to the kitchen. Keep the herbs within hands reach makes it easy for the cook to chop and provides flavor to dishes while reducing sodium.  Herbs when added to any dish, accent’s and brings out the best from vegetables and meats. Consider making some changes to your meal preparation; buy spices and always keep a bouquet of garden fresh herbs within hands reach ready to be enjoyed.
Recipe Ideas

Spices (1/2 -1 teaspoon)
Allspice, Cumin, Paprika, Red Pepper Flakes Saffron, Tumeric

Herbs (1-2 Tablespoon)
Basil,  Cilantro, Ginger, Marjoram, Mint, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme , Garlic, Onion

Sauces:

  • Excellent combination for any tomato base: Oregano, Garlic, Parsley, Red Pepper flakes, EVOO
  • Ragu base tomato sauce with or without meat. Chopped Onion, 6-10  Basil leaves, EVOO
  • Cream sauce: Chopped sage, 1/2 c. onion, 1 minced garlic, cracked pepper
  • Spaghetti Sauce
  • Michelangleo Sauce

Soups:

  • 1 tsp Tarragon, 1 tsp Red Pepper Flakes, 1 square inch cheese Rind from the end of Parmesan Cheese added to any soup. Allow to simmer for 45 minutes.
  • With a 2 tbsp olive oil combine equal parts of ROSEMARY, SAGE, THYME, to a GARLIC clove, half ONION for your favorite beans. • Try any of these herbs in your steamed vegetables or in soups.
  • Choose from 1/2 tsp Mint, Lemon Zest, or Dill are great in rice with vegetables and kidney beans, or in dips with yogurt and low fat sour cream.
  • 1 tsp chopped Chives and 1 tsp parsley are great on top of salad, soup or baked potato. They are also good in dips with yogurt and sour cream.
  • Fava Bean Soup
  • Creamy Zucchini Soup

•  For a delicious Pot Roast choose a group of seasonings, rub onto meat, place into a covered dish or closed plastic bag, allowing to absorb flavors for 4+ hours then prepare according to roasting time.

Herbs releases a wonderful aroma adding great flavors to your meals.

•  Chicken and Turkey

Choose group of seasoning and herbs and rub onto Chicken and Turkey

  • 1 tsp Turmeric, 1 tsp Marjoram, 1 minced  Garlic Clove, 1 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil .
  •  Zest of 1 Lemon and 1 Orange, 1 Tbsp chopped mint, 1 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  •  1 Tbsp chives, 1/2 tsp Oregano, 1 minced Garlic clove,  1/2 c. chopped onion, 1/2 tsp Cumin, 1 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil with tomatoes (tomato sauce), rice, black beans and corn for a delicious Spanish flavor.
  • Chicken and Dumplings (reduced-sodium)
  • Pork Roast and Vegetables
Steak  Marinade steaks in 1/4 c balsamic vinegar to tenderize the meat, adding a bit of 1/8 tsp salt, pepper and dried/chopped mint leaves
Wine Substitute
3/4 cup wine can be substituted with1/2 cup apple cider vinegar or red wine vinegar and 1/4 cup water.
Fish
  • • Place fish onto a large aluminum foil. In the center of fish place 5-10 leaves of parsley, 4 garlic slices, 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes. Completely cover fish and seal aluminum, place into oven and bake on 350 for 20 minutes.
  • Tuscan Cacciucco Fish Stew

Tips to reduce sodium:
Table Salt
Omit salt or reduce salt by ½ in most recipes (except in products with yeast). Cook foods without adding salt.
Don’t put the salt shaker on the table: try pepper, or Mrs Dash salt substituteFrozen or canned vegetables
Choose frozen vegetables without sauces or use no-salt-added canned goods. Rinsing canned vegetables will help reduce sodium.Seasoning Salt or spice mixes with salt
Use salt-free seasonings and spice mixes, herbs, spices, lemon juice, vinegar, mustard, garlic or Chile peppers to flavor food instead of salt.

Seasonings high in sodium include: catsup, chili sauce, chili powder, bouillon cubes, barbecue sauce, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, and meat tenderizers.

Sodium Benefit’s & Limit’s

Do you crave salt or sugar?

Have you noticed that your tastes may vary, craving salty or sweet foods in different moments of the day? Years of gathered research from studies done on infant’s to adult’s show that salt  is both a preference and a requirement.  The same research proved that we have a craving for sweet tasting food’s driven by a gene which promotes the need for fruit and vegetables.

“It is worth one’s salt” to understand sodium’s importance in maintaining the health of  the body and the difference between:

  • Salt and sodium
  • Salts benefit’s and limit’s
  • How to interpret our blood pressure numbers
  • Foods reducing Sodium level’s

Difference between Salt and Sodium

While sodium and salt are words that are  often interchangeable the difference is determined between the name of the mineral and the function of one of its element’s.   Salt, also known as sodium chloride  (NaCl) is made up of  two elements: 40% sodium (Na) and 60% chloride (Cl).  1/4 teaspoon of salt contains 600 milligrams of sodium (Na).  The body requires no more that 2300 milligrams of sodium per day, or 1 teaspoon of salt a day.

Sea Salt and Table Salt have the same amount of sodium. Sea salt is produced from the evaporation of sea water, while table salt is: mined, ground and has iodide added to the grains. (which lacks in sea salt).

Salt’s Benefit’s and Limit’s

Briefly stated, the benefits of sodium are found in: sweating, transporting nutrient’s from head to foot, transmitting nerve impulses (250-500 mg sodium just for neurological & psychological function’s) and contracting muscles such as your heart.

Equally important are the limit’s that sodium imposes; when the kidney has an excess of sodium it releases water which then  increases the blood volume.  As the blood level increases, it’s flow within the body also increases the blood pressure.  The heart will in turn work harder to pump blood which in creates instability within the blood vessel’s and creates a risk for heart problems, or a stroke. A great argument for limiting daily salt intake. Limit sodium intake to 1500 mg Na per day (1/2 tsp salt) For those: over age 51, have diabetes, high blood pressure or chronic kidney disease.

Interpreting Blood Pressure Number’s

A Doctor’s appointment will prove valuable  in evaluating an individual’s blood pressure.  As adult’s age systolic blood pressure  increases by four points per decade. The systolic number is the first number documented in a blood pressure reading 120/80. 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) indicates  the maximum arterial pressure  during a contraction of the left ventricle of the heart contracts. It is advised to not exceed the maximum pressure of 120 so as to not force the heart to work harder in pumping the necessary blood that the body requires. While the diastolic, second number “80”mm Hg, represents the pressure when the heart is resting between beats.

  • Rating                                         Systolic                Diastolic
  • Optimal                                      <100                     <80
  • Normal                                      < 130                     <85
  • High Normal                                 135-139                  85-89
  • Hypertension Stage 1                   140-159                  90-99
  • Hypertension Stage 2                  160-179                 100-109
  • Hypertension Stage 3                  >179+                  >109

Symbols:
Less than <
Greater than >

Eat Food High in Potassium to Reduce Sodium Levels 

If no other health problem’s are present, keeping blood pressure within normal level’s can be achieved through simple changes at mealtime. Daily drink 6-8 glasses of water and chew on food with higher amounts of Potassium  (K)  which will push unnecessary amounts of Na from the body. An individual needs to consume only 4700 mg K per day to keep the mechanic’s of the body in optimal condition. While all fruits and vegetables will have Potassium the following have higher amounts, choose any 2-3 per meal:

  • 1 Sweet Potato or  1 Baked Potato
  • 8 oz Yogurt
  • 4 Prunes 0r 1 Banana
  • 1/2 c diced Tomato or 1/2 c. chopped Spinach
  • 1/2 c. White or  Lima or 1 Tbsp Soy bean’s
  • 3 ounces Clams, Halibut, Cod or Tuna Fish
If  blood pressure falls into the hypertension category foods to immediately avoid: Carrots, Celery, Spinach, Beets and remove the Water Softner.

 4  Effective Changes to Reduce Sodium when Preparing, or Seasoning Meals:

  •  When purchasing prepackaged foods READ the FOOD LABEL make sure that the Potassium values are higher than the sodium values.
  • Throw out bottled: seasoning’s, garlic and onion powder’s
  • Reduce salt by 1/2 of normal use
  • Incorporate 1 Tablespoon freshly chopped herbs, 1/2 tsp lemon zest, 1/4 tsp cracked black pepper, a minced garlic clove and/2  onion for flavoring foods.   Herbs and Spices to Replace the Salt Shaker

By: Kimberly Crocker

References

Low Sodium Dietary Tips

Adjusting flavor, while reducing salt.  Mildy palate pleasing herbs in all your favortie dishes.

Basil, Marjoram, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Garlic, Onion   • Use each alone or mix them together.

• BASIL, OREGANO, PARSLEY taste great in tomato sauces, (use low sodium tomatoes or tomato sauce).   Serve the sauce with pasta or rice. 

  • Fresh minced garlic and diced onion sauté in a 2 Tbsp oil for 7 minutes on med low. Add tomato sauce simmer for 20 minutes, add oregano and parsley, OR basil at end.
  • With 2 tbsp olive oil combine equal parts of ROSEMARY, SAGE, THYME, to a GARLIC clove, half ONION saute` in pan on medium low for 7-10 minutes and then add to your favorite bean dish.
    • Try any of these herbs in your steamed vegetables or in soups.
  • Chives, Dill, Parsley ,Tarragon       • Steam any one of these with your vegetables or with fish.
  • • Tarragon is great in soup.
  • • Dill is great in rice with vegetables and kidney beans, or in dips with yogurt and low fat sour cream.
  • Chives and parsley are great on top of salad, soup or baked potato. They are also good in dips with yogurt and sour cream.

Allspice, Garlic, Marjoram ,Parsley ,Thyme       • Mix these herbs and spices together and rub into any meat, poultry, or pork  for a terrific dish.
Marjoram, Rosemary, Tarragon             • Combine spices and rub into the chicken or turkey (with the skin removed) and steam it.
Curry powder, Turmeric, minced Garlic and diced Onions   • Saute` in 2-3 Tbsp olive oil for 7 minutes on med low temp, then add tomatoes (tomato sauce), rice, black beans and corn for a delicious Spanish flavor.

Low Sodium Meal Plan DASH Diet

“Dash Diet” 

Avoid eating foods from cans that are high in sodium (salt)

The average American presently consumes 5-8 tsps of salt per day! This is extremely dangerous in the long run for your organs, but specifically for the heart and kidneys.

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH), or a low sodium diet is  an easy lifestyle to adapt by limiting salt intake to 1-2 tsp’s per day & add potassium to provide balance and flushing out excess sodium with:

Eat a Meal High in Potassium: Fruit, Veggies, Legumes, Fish

  • Fresh Fruit
  • Fresh Vegetables
  • Legumes (dried, cooked at home, seasoned: garlic, onion, rosemary)
  • Fresh Fish.
  • 6-8 Glasses of water or tea.

Following the Mediterranean or DASH Diet gives a person the proper amounts of food consumed at each sitting therefore reducing risk of hypertension for an individual.  There are a variety of Salt Substitutes on the market.   Mrs. Dash is commonly used and a favorite of most, does come in a variety of flavors. However, vegetables tossed and sauteed in olive oil with fresh herbs and fish or meats prepared with spices and herbs, add flavor and reduce sodium. Obtain more ideas on how to use Herbs and Spices to Replace the Salt Shaker

Fluids are equally important to a successful diet.  Lemon Water made with 1/2-1 freshly squeezed lemon in a glass of water each day, an additional source of potassium to rid the body of excess sodium . Foods to restrict if instructed to follow a Low Sodium Meal are: Carrots, Celery, Spinach, Beets.  Additional tips:

  • Stop consuming tap water that is conditioned with a water softener
  • Drink bottled water and Green, Black or White Tea
  • Rinse all canned foods really well before preparing them.

Meal Plan Low Sodium (LS)

Breakfast
Bread or Cereal…. Oatmeal (Instant “Heart Healthy Advanced Nutrition” LS and high Potassium)
Fruit…………………..apple, orange, kiwi, banana, dried apricots, prunes, raisins
Orange Juice or skim 1% Milk.

Snack am
Fruit 

Lunch
Vegetable……………cole slaw
Vegetable……………LS Cream of potato soup, baked sweet potato
Meat…………………..meatloaf with LS Gravy (3 0z). grilled or baked salmon, fish
Vegetable…………..twice baked potato and steamed green beans
Bread…………………wheat Roll
Dessert……………..orange sherbet, pears, plums

Snack pm 
Fruit…………………..(Choose 1) banana, Kiwi, orange, seasonal fruit

Milk…………………. ..4-6 oz low or nonfat yogurt

Dinner
Meat……………….,,seasoned Chicken Breast (3 oz)  (turned in freshly chopped herbs and garlic)
Bread……………….sesame seed multi grain bun,
Vegetable………….Lettuce, tomato and onion (cooked or raw)
Vegetable……….. .soup Lima or white beans, salad with avocado, beets, spinach
Fruit…………………fruit, melon
……………LS apple pie

References