Nutrition for the Colon

An abundance of flavonoids from fruits and vegetables are the best way to nourish the colon. Specifically, tomatoes, sauces, and salsa are cleansing and important for colon health.

Each organ must be properly nourished and cared for through daily meals, snacks and beverages. Likewise, each organ has a list of foods to avoid that have demonstrated the ability to inflict harm,  lead to malabsorption, food intolerance, disease, or cancer. It is important to note that there are variables to colon health, in addition to nutrition, which should all be discussed with your doctor.  (Genetics, Habits, Lifestyle, Vices)

The colon (large intestine) functions as an internal sewage system, has 4 sections and connects to the anus for excretion of feces.

The Large Intestine, or Colon, has four sections: the ascending colon, the transverse colon, the descending colon and the sigmoid colon. It is about 6 ft in length and due to its diameter in width, it is called the large intestine ending at the anus where the feces is excreted. The small intestine is 26 ft in length and much smaller in diameter and therefore, bears the name of small intestine.

The purpose of the large intestine is to carry the sewage (digested or undigested foods) from our bodies.  As modern society has “developed”, the food consumption has changed from: fruit, vegetables, meat, poultry, fish, and oils, to food that has been engineered such as: cookies, chips, candy, and soda.

Toxins and Mucus.  The human body was not designed to digest toxin filled foods. When consuming harmful foods, a signal is sent from the stomach, to the intestine, to alert the colon as to what is coming down the line.  The colon produces a mucus to protect itself from the harmful foods and toxins.  Overtime an accumulated thick layer of hardened mucus has lined the colon that can weigh between 5-11 pounds! The mucus production should disintegrate on its own through occasional use, over use leads to toxemia and disease.

Weight Loss.  Choosing to “diet” can further a problem by introducing fruits and vegetables  to an already blocked system.  Before changing eating habits, a doctor may advice the patient to fast and then to flush their bodies of the toxins by taking a laxative (colenema). This is a safe cleansing that can be done in the privacy of one’s bathroom.  For a natural cleansing: Cut a lemon in half, squeeze the juice of both lemon halves into a glass of water.  Drink twice a day; once in the morning and after dinner. (Just as a car engine would not have new oil added to the old filthy built up oil, a clean engine is often the best way to begin a new dietary lifestyle.)

American Cancer Society Identifies Risk Factors

Type 2 Diabetes.   According to the American Cancer Society, “People with type 2 (usually non-insulin dependent) diabetes have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. Both type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer share some of the same risk factors (such as excess weight). But even after taking these factors into account, people with type 2 diabetes still have an increased risk. They also tend to have a less favorable prognosis (outlook) after diagnosis. Nourish the Colon with optimal choices.”

Genetics: Increased risk factor is tied to familial Colon cancer “with a history of colorectal cancer in one or more first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, or children) are at increased risk. The risk is about doubled in those with a single affected first-degree relative. It is even higher if the first-degree relative was diagnosed when they were younger than 45, or if more than one first-degree relative is affected.

People with a family history of adenomatous polyps or colorectal cancer should talk with their doctor about screening before age 50. If you have had adenomatous polyps or colorectal cancer, it’s important to tell your close relatives so that they can pass along that information to their doctors and start screening at the right age.”

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP): “FAP is caused by changes (mutations) in the APC gene that a person inherits from his or her parents. About 1% of all colorectal cancers are due to FAP.

People with this disease typically develop hundreds or thousands of polyps in their colon and rectum, usually in their teens or early adulthood. Cancer usually develops in 1 or more of these polyps as early as age 20. By age 40, almost all people with this disorder will have developed colon cancer if the colon isn’t removed first to prevent it.

Gardner syndrome is a type of FAP that also involves benign (non-cancerous) tumors of the skin, soft connective tissue, and bones.”

Hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC): “HNPCC, also known as Lynch syndrome, accounts for about 2% to 4% of all colorectal cancers.  The cancers in this syndrome also develop when people are relatively young. People with HNPCC can have polyps, but they only have a few, not hundreds as in FAP. The lifetime risk of colorectal cancer in people with this condition may be as high as 80%.

Women with this condition also have a very high risk of developing cancer of the endometrium (lining of the uterus). Other cancers linked with HNPCC include cancer of the ovary, stomach, small bowel, pancreas, kidney, brain, ureters (tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder), and bile duct.”

Recommended Dietary Intake

  • Water, or water with juice of fresh lemon twice a day
  • 2-3 cups Green Tea (decaffeinated) a day
  • Daily Aspirin
  • Raw Plant Foods (fruits and vegetables)
  • Aloe Vera (beverage) http://aloe-verajuice.com/
  • Broccoli & Kale. Butyrate is formed in the colon through bacteria fermentation, in the presence of carbohydrates rich in fiber.  Known to have a number of anti cancer effects, certain foods  are recommended for preventative colon care.
  • Sweet Potatoes (Vitamin A, C, E, Pantothenic Acid, Manganese, Phytosterols) increased motility of bowels so toxins move quickly through, protection against cellular mutation.
  • Mushrooms, Onion, Garlic allows for the immune system to work more aggressively.
  • Yogurt:  Returns balance of healthy bacteria and resident flora, which promotes bowel movements and waste elimination.  Yogurt is rich in Vitamin D and Calcium, both are imperative to organ health.
  • Tuna (Omega 3 for cellular reparation)
  • Turmeric (gives color to Curry. Can be placed into a spice shaker and used on vegetables, soups, salads, poultry, fish, pasta, rice) anti-carcinogenic
  • Cinnamon: anti carcinogenic
  • Dried Fruit, Beans, Brown Rice all have fiber that remove toxins from the intestine.
  • Flavonoids are antioxidants and should be consumed daily; found in all fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices
  • Foods that produce Butyrate to remove toxins are: green vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, sweet potatoes, whole grains.

What has shown to Harm the Colon should be Avoided or limited.

  • Red Meat (1’c a month: Men 3 ounces and Women 2 ounces)
  • Lamb (1’c a month reduced amounts)
  • Pork (1’c a month reduced amounts)
  • Processed Meats
  • Excessive Processed, Snacks, & Fried Foods
  • Alcohol (1 glass of wine or 1 beer once a week)
  • Smoking (Avoid!)

What has been linked to Polyps

  • Over cooked foods
  • Dairy, Cheese (no more than 1 ounce 3 times a week)
  • Red Meats
  • Fried Foods
  • Processed Foods (chips, crackers, candy, cookies, fried foods)

Foods to Avoid if a colostomy has been performed

  • Asparagus
  • Beans
  • Broccoli
  • Celery
  • Corn
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Popcorn
  • Raw onions or raw garlic

Nutrient balance is critical to colon health. The daily recommended intake (DRI) of 4 servings of fruits and 5 servings of vegetables, Vitamin D and calcium all promote healthy organs.

Families who have a history of colorectal or colon cancer should discuss genetic testing and review a dietary and exercise plan with their doctor.

Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio BASC DTR

References

Health Benefits of Lemon Water

Relieving digestive problems can be done through food and beverages that you may already have in your own kitchen.

Squeeze juice from 1 lemon into a glass of water.

Constipation, upset stomach gas pains, kidney stones and edema? Can all be uncomfortable and difficult to overcome. A solution that works and practiced in many countries is Drinking Lemon Water.

There is a natural way to soothe body pain,or reduce flatulence and relieve constipation, providing your body with the necessary fluid intake, Vitamin C  and potassium to flush out excess sodium, keeping your organs (i.e. heart, kidneys ) and muscles healthy and the electrolytes in balance. 

 

Malic Acid, a common ingredient used in over the counter “upset stomach” medication, is a “Naturally occuring Organic element” within lemons.  The alkaline malic acid is introduced to the stomach working with the pH balance and then into the intestinal tract, reducing the negative effects of enzymes that contribute to gas and bacteria. 

The SECRET HEALTH HINT comes from one of the many benefits of a lemon.  A simple recipe will provide immediate results:

1.  Squeeze the juice of 1/2 a lemon into a glass of water. Do this once or twice a day if you are under 150 pounds/83 kilo’s, once in the morning and once at night.

2.  Over 150 pounds/ 83 kilo’s, squeeze the juice of 1 whole lemon in a glass of warm water, twice a day.

Fiber  and exercise will also “get things moving” and should be a regular part of ones daily dietary intake.  

Food and beverages that may assist in synthesizing bile salts and secreting bile acids, returning you to comfort are: berries, watermelon, celery, spinach, dandelion, artichokes, fennel or dandelion tea and spices like fennel seeds, turmeric, or red pepper flakes. (see quantities below.) All credited to contributing to the success of a healthy body. (Suffer from IBS?  Include these foods & beverages in your daily intake.) 

Lastly, keep your muscles toned by scheduling a walk 20 minutes per day to improve your overall digestion and stay in a regular way! 

 

By Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio

Include the following foods into your daily routine to relieve stomach discomfort and promote regular bowel movements.

 

1/3 cup berries of choice

1/2 cup watermelon

1-2 stalks celery

1 cup spinach salad

1/3 cup sauteed dandelion greens

1/4 cup artichokes

1/3 cup sliced fennel

12-18 fennel seeds can be chewed on per day

1/4 tsp turmeric added to potatoes, rice or pasta

1/8 tsp of pepper flakes to soups and vegetables

Drink plenty of water and tea! 2-4 cups of fennel or dandelion tea a day will also relieve discomfort of the stomach.

More nutrtion articles to read:

Fast Relief: Fennel Seeds Combat Gas and Upset Stomach  and  Turmeric to Ease Acid Reflex

References

http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/benefit_of_drinking_green_tea

Nephron Protectively due to effects of Vitamin C

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23009987

Anti-bacteria activity reversed by Vitamin C and E

Calculate Cholesterol, Choose TLC Diet to Menu Plan

Being informed and understanding what cholesterol is will provide stronger knowledge of individual “Specimen Information”, which should be requested from your Doctor after having blood drawn. Compare your numbers to the information listed below,  choose your foods wisely to improve your daily nutritional intake, and cleanse your body, optimizing it’s overall function in keeping you healthy.

Cholesterol is a fat,  lipid, or a sterol, from which hormones are made. It is a waxy substance that resembles the very fine scrapings of a whitish-yellow candle. Cholesterol flows through your body via your bloodstream, lipids are oil-based and blood is water-based, they don’t mix. If cholesterol were dumped into your bloodstream, it would congeal into unusable globs.

The fat in these particles are made up of cholesterol, triglycerides and a phospholipid, which helps make the whole particle stick together. Triglycerides are a particular type of fat that have three fatty acids attached to an alcohol called glycerol, composed of 90 percent of the fat in the food you eat. The body needs triglycerides for energy, but as with cholesterol, too much is bad for the arteries and the heart.

  • Total Cholesterol Reference Range: 125-200 mg/dl     
  • HDL Cholesterol Reference Range: 40-60 mg/dl 
  • TriglyceridesReference Range:  <150mg/dl                   
  • Direct LDL Cholesterol Reference Range: 100 – 129 mg/dl

                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Healthy Cholesterol Levels, (HDL) should be greater than 50-60 mg/dl.   HDL is a cholestrol that works within the arteries to reduce accumulation of plaque, that can lead to artherosclerosis, in turn, reducing your risk for heart disease. HDL is monitored to ensure there is enough of it to fight off the plaque build up within the arteries.

 “LDL cholesterol”, explained by Harvard University“in most people, (60-70 % of cholesterol) is carried in LDL particles, which act as ferries, taking cholesterol to the parts of the body that need it. Unfortunately, if you have too much LDL in the bloodstream, it deposits the cholesterol into the arteries, which can cause blockages and lead to heart attacks. The good news is that the amount of LDL in your blood-stream is related to the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol you eat. So, most people can decrease their LDL if they follow a reduced-fat diet.”

VLDL, stated by the “Clinical Reference Laboratory”, expressed as: “VLDL is a major carrier of triglyceride (60 -70% triglyceride 10-15% cholesterol). Circulating fatty acids are converted by the liver to form triglycerides.” Dr. Ginsberg of Columbia university simplifies the definition, “Very-Low Density Lipids are complexes of lipids and proteins assembled in the liver in response to nutrients and hormones. When VLDL are secreted, they carry almost all of the triglyceride in the blood-stream (they are about 85% triglycerides themselves), transporting triglycerides from the liver. When we are overweight, insulin resistant, or have diabetes, our livers secrete more VLDL with more triglycerides on every VLDL particle”.

People have varying degrees of success in lowering their cholesterol by changing their diets.  Meal Plan changes and Exercise both contribute to  lowering cholesterol and are highly recommended before pharmaceuticals are introduced. High cholesterol due to dietary intake of high saturated  foods (anything with animal fat) could be lowered by 5% to 20% with nutritional changes. The Therapeutic Lifestyle Change (TLC) Diet is recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. 

Calculating total cholesterol helps to put the pieces of the whole together.   The math equation for calculating total cholesterol is:

Total Cholesterol Formula  (TC) = LDL + HDL + (Triglycerides/5)

  • Sample lipid panel
  • Cholesterol, Total=195
  • HDL Cholesterol=55
  • Triglycerides = 100  (100/5=20)
  • Direct LDL Cholesterol=120

How Total Cholesterol is calculated using the sample numbers listed above.

  • example: (LDL) 120+ (HDL) 55 + 20= 195 (TC) Total Cholesterol

Calculating:  VLDL=Triglycerides/5

  • Triglycerides=100
  • example: 100/5=20 (VLDL)
  • Reference Range for VLDL is 5-40 mg/dl

Calculate Cholesterol Ratio

  • Total Cholesterol (mg/dl) / HDL Cholesterol (mg/dl)
  • Example: Total Cholesterol 200 mg/dl/ 50 mg/dl  HDL Cholesterol = 4.1  According to the American Heart Association is to keep your cholesterol ratio at 5 to 1 or lower.
  • Ideal ratio will be 3.5 to 1. Higher cholesterol ratio indicates a risk of heart disease, a lower ratio indicates a reduced risk of heart disease.

 

Various foods, beverages and spices are known for reducing, or interfering with bad cholesterol (LDL) and carrying it out of the body. Choose a variety of foods from the following lists including them at all your meals.

  •  Fruits and Vegetables (totaling 9 per day)
  • Teas
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Cinnamon1-4g (1/3 tsp – 1 1/2 tsp a day)
  • Ginger (250 mcg/day capsule form)
  •  Honey 3 1/2 tablespoons / day

Reduce the saturated fat in your diet 

  1. Eat fish 3-4 times a week and benefit from Omega 3!
  2. Limit the amount of meat and milk products.
  3. Choose low-fat products from various food groups.
  4. Replace butter, a saturated fat with: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola, or Peanut oils.  7% of your daily calories should come from saturated fat (200 mg)   with 25% to 35% of daily calories  from unsaturated fat. 
  5.  Your diet should include calories to maintain your desired weight and avoid gaining weight.

Fluids are equally important to a successful diet.  Add 1-2 glasses of water with 1/2 to 1 whole lemon each day. Drink 1-2 cups of Oolong tea each day. Oolong tea burns over 157% more fat than Green Tea and is a popular tea designed to accelerate weight loss. 

TLC Diet is recommended by Doctors as a path for reducing high cholesterol.  Calories/day  1100 – 1695

Lean meat, poultry, fish, dry legumes Choose 5 ounces (140 g)  per day  

  • Anchovies, Mackeral, Sardines, Salmon,
  • Substitute 1/4 cup tofu, or 1/2 cup dry beans or peas for 1 ounce of meat or fish.
  • 2 tablespoons (1 oz) nuts (Almonds, Walnuts, Hazelnuts, Peanuts Soynuts) or seeds
  • Eggs, 2 yolks per week, 1 whole egg. Egg whites or substitutes are okay to eat.
  • Lean Meat. 3 0z. 165 calories, 0 g carbohydrate, 21 g protein, 9 g fat

Low-fat milk products.  Choose 2 per day     

  • 2 to 3 per day
  • 1 cup nonfat or 1% milk
  • 1 cup nonfat or low-fat yogurt
  • 1 ounce fat-free or low-fat cheese
  • Each serving. 80-110 calories, 12 g carbohydrate, 8 g protein, 0-3 g fat

Fruits.  Choose 4-5 per day the selection is endless!    

  • Apple, Apricots, Berries, Banana, Grapes, Melons, Orange, Pear, Plums, Prunes
  • Each serving.  60 calories, 15 g carbohydrate, 0 g protein, 0 g fat

Various Vegetables!  Choose 5-7 per day          

  • Artichokes, Avocado, Peppers, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Mushrooms,Eggplants, Asparagus, Legumes, Broccoli.
  • 1/2 cup cooked (season with garlic parsley and oil), Grilled, or Raw vegetables
  • Each serving.  25 calories, 5 g carbohydrate, 2 g protein, 0 g fat
    1 cup raw thick green leafy greens

Whole grains for bread, cereals, pasta, rice .  Choose 4-6 servings per day.

  •  Whole Grains, Choose Aunt Millies breads.
  • 1 slice whole grain bread
  • 1/2 wheat or multi-grain bagel, or English muffin
  • 1 ounce cold cereal (Bran)
  • Oatmeal for breakfast. (Quaker Oatmeal steel cut. Avoid 1 minute oatmeal)
  • 1/2 cup cooked whole grain pasta, rice, noodles, or other grains
  • Each serving. 80 calories, 15 g carbohydrate, 3 g protein, 1-3 g fat

Fat and oils.  Choose 2-3 servings per day

  • Each serving.  45 calories, 0 g carbohydrate, 0 g protein, 5 g fat.
    No Trans Fat (hydrogenated oils)
    1 teaspoon monounsaturated oil, such as Canola, Corn, EVOO, or Peanut
    1 tablespoon salad dressing (vinagrette)
    1 tbsp MCT Oil

By:  K. Crocker

Literature Research

  1.  Diet Low Sodium Meal Plan
  2. VLDL http://www.crlcorp.com/testDetails.cfm?facilityID=TLS&testID=510
  3. VLDL Dr. Ginsberg  http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/569664av
  4. LDL Harvard University  http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Understanding_Cholesterol.htm
  5. Ginger reduces LDL Cholesterol  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=ginger%20reduces%20ldl
  6. Cinnamon reduces LDL Cholesterol http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14633804
  7. Honey Reduces Cholesterol http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454257
  8. Calculate Cholesterol Ratio  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cholesterol-ratio/AN01761

Hyper & Hypothyroidism and Nutritional Therapy

An ultra sound of the thyroid gland

Common expressions:   “I am so tired” and  “I feel cold”.  We can thank the small gland that’s wrapped around the trachea, our thyroid for various sensations. This small butterfly organ has 3 principle functions: cellular differentiation, growth and metabolism. Two key hormones (thyroxine) promotes the body’s growth & development and with help from the parathyroid gland, there’s bone formation and control of calcium in the blood (hormone calcitonin). The small double lobed gland claims to fame are also attributed to: sleep patterns, weight maintenance, moods, immune system, muscle agility and heart rate, etc.                                                                                     

While the thyroid is busy deciding how it will control the bodies energy, there may be an over production of the thyroid hormone (autoimmune disease or Graves Disease) it’s called Hyperthyroidism. Other causes linked to hyperthyroidism may be attributed to inflammation, nodules or tumors on the thyroid. You may notice an increased heat rate with exercise and excessive sweating with or without exercise.

There maybe a time  in it’s lifespan that the thyroid hormone output is reduced, called Hypothyroidism. Some of the initial symptoms are: weight gain with no change in diet or exercise, depression, and exhaustion.  The negative effects of untreated hypothyroidism are: increased cholesterol levels, strokes, cardio vascular disease and the immune system that turns on the body first attacking the thyroid itself (Hashimoto Disease). THE GOOD NEWS is that hypothyroidism is easily treated through daily medication.

Typical reference ranges for normal thyroids

Test From To Units
TSH 0.4 4.5 mU/L (milliunits per litre)
FT4 9.0 25.0 pmol/L (picomoles per litre)
FT3 3.5 7.8 pmol/L (picomoles per litre)

These ranges are only a guide. The reference range for FT4 in particular does currently vary between methods and so any ‘typical’ reference range quoted will be subject to method and local interpretation

Test results outside the reference range

  • high SH level with a low FT4 level: Hypothyroidism (under-active thyroid)
  • low TSH level with a high FT4 level and a high FT3 level: Hyperthyroidism (over-active thyroid)
  • Abnormal TSH levels together with normal FT4 levels indicate you may be at risk of developing a thyroid disorder
  • A low TSH levels together with a low FT4 levels can indicate a disorder of the pituitary gland

SYMPTOMS OF MALFUNCTIONING THYROID  can be noticed at any age and can even be misinterpreted as signs of aging;

Diagnosis. After a blood diagnosis, your doctor will prescribe a medication that you will take every morning, so that your thyroid wakes up in the morning with you, one hour after taking the medication you may eat. Within 2 weeks to 2 months, most symptoms will go away and your energy will return. The medication is something that you will take the rest or your life, a small price to pay for remaining healthy. “As of February 2010, at most laboratories in the U.S., the official “normal” reference range for the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) blood test runs from approximately .5 to 4.5/5.0 according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.
MEDICATION INTAKE  will make a difference in homeostasis. The time of day that you take your “Synthroid” can influence how you feel, level of alertness, how you sleep and stability in weight. Studies performed show that medication taken at bedtime allows for proper absorption of the medication, without interference from nutritional minerals that could otherwise alter it’s function. Changing the time of day that you take your medication should be discussed with your Doctor.  For observation purposes they may have the switch made after a blood draw in order to better control the variables and achieve accurate documentation of the TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone).

NUTRIENTS

There are several nutrients that play key roles in the thyroid gland and the thyroid hormone function: zinc, copper, iodine, selenium and omega-3 fats. A multi-vitamin along with eating foods high in these minerals, is essential for normal thyroid hormone production and metabolism.

Dietary sources of zinc include: seafood, beef, oatmeal, chicken, liver, spinach, nuts and seeds.

Copper is mainly found in liver and other organ meats, eggs, yeast, beans, nuts and seeds.

Iodine is also an important building block for thyroid hormone.  Nutritional sources of iodine include sea fish, sea vegetables (kelp, dulse, hijiki, nori and kombu) and iodized salt.  Iodine is such a key component of thyroid health. 

FOODS TO LIMIT.  A high LDL Cholesterol number accompanied by a high Triglyceride number is linked to Insulin resistance, often noted with hypothyroidism. Foods that should be eliminated: white flour, white sugar, rice, pasta, bread, corn, potatoes (all types), cereal, desserts, dairy products, meat, citrus fruits. Caffeine, calcium should be consumed in limited amounts.   Goitrogen foods are also able to block iodine, therefore, utilization of these foods should be limited. They include:turnips, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, mustard, cassava root, soybeans, peanuts, pine nuts and millet, (peaches and strawberries may also interfere). Cooking, however, usually inactivates goitrogens.

BEST FOODS to promote metabolism: Sour fruits (kiwi, juice of fresh lemon), pears, apples, plums, fish, turkey, chicken, legumes and vegetables.

Selenium.  One of the best natural sources of selenium is Brazil Nuts. Selenium is an important mineral that contributes to the health of the thyroid. 1 ounce of nuts a day will benefit the small gland.

Omega-3 fatty acids will also contribute to normal thyroid function, which can be found in fish and fish oils, as well as vitamin A, which improves thyroid receptor binding and thyroid hormone activity.

Tyrosine, an amino acid and a precursor for making thyroid hormoneA deficiency of tyrosine or low protein diets can contribute to low thyroid function.  Check with your doctor if supplementation at a dose of 500-1,500 milligrams (mg) daily, which has therapeutic benefits, is needed.

Exercise. Daily exercise stimulates thyroid gland function and increases tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormone.  Try walking, biking, dancing at least 20 minutes a day.  However, walking 30 minutes twice a day, seems to encourage both the fuctionability of the thyroid and weight loss versus weight gain normally associated with hypothyroidism. While with hyperthyroidism an exercise regimen should be advised by a doctor in order to monitor a fast heart rate.

By Kimberly Crocker

References

Kidney Disease Low Phosphorus Diet

We are all provided with two equal fist sized organs, found in our lower back on either side of the spine just above the waist called Kidneys. Renal physiology is the study of kidney function, while nephrology is a medical specialty that focuses on kidney disease.

In brief, the kidneys perform multiple functions to sustain the life of the body, cleanse the body by removing waste and excess fluid through urine, provide a balance of water, salt, potassium, phosphorus and produce an active form of Vitamin D.  Multiple hormones and enzymes are produced in the kidneys and released into the body affecting the function of other organs, signaling red blood cell production, regulating blood pressure (Renin) and calcium metabolism.

The degradation of the kidneys can be influenced by a variety of factors. Having regular check-ups is key to kidney health. Do not miss doctor appointments if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic urinary tract infection, bladder issues, chronic lower back pain. Any of all of these factors should be monitored an communicated in a timely manner.

   When kidneys begin to function improperly an individual may have any, or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue and weakness, loss of energy, sleep problems, any change in output or color of urine, decreased mental awareness, muscle twitches or cramps, hiccups, swelling of feet or ankles, persistent itching, chest pains, shortness of breath, high blood pressure. Symptoms should be discussed with your Doctor. Early detection of kidney disease can be addressed, so that the health of the kidneys can be sustained.

A diet low in phosphorus, sodium and balanced protein is critical when addressing kidney disease. Listed below are foods allowed for patients facing kidney issues taken from DaVita who specializes in Renal Disease.  Four important points should be reviewed with your Doctor or Dietitian.

  • Foods Low in Phosphorus (less than 110 mg per serving)
  • Consume 800-1000 mg of phosphorous per day.
  • Portion Size is critical to staying in range of low phosphorus.
  • (A normal phosphorus blood level is 3.5 to 5.5 mg/dL)
Additional information on the kidneys can be reviewed at The National Kidney Foundation. Learn more about Renal Health, disease and locate professionals that can answer your questions.
By: Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio
References
The National Kidney Foundation http://www.kidney.org/index.cfm
DaVita http://www.davita.com/
Webmd http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-kidney-disease-basic-information
Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/kidney-failure/DS00682

LOW PHOSPHORUS FOOD SERVINGS & mg/100g

Low-phosphorus meat and poultry choices
Fresh or frozen red meats without additives or enhancements are better choices (be sure to check ingredient labels; even fresh chicken and pork may be injected with phosphates and sodium) for a kidney diet.

** Choose meats without breading, marinades or sauce. On average, fresh meat contains 65 mg of phosphorus per ounce and 7 grams of protein per ounce. Check with your Doctor or Dietitian on serving size per meat. While most will say that 3 ounces is fine the following serving size has been modified to a 2 ounce serving size.

Phosphorus content for a 2-ounce portion, cooked:

Beef, pot roast: 104 mg Beef, sirloin steak: 126 mg
Chicken breast, skinless: 126  mg Chicken thigh, skinless: 100 mg
Hamburger patty 90% lean ground beef: 114 mg Lamb chop: 122 mg
Pork roast: 126 mg
Turkey breast meat, skinless: 122 mg Turkey thigh meat, skinless: 114 mg

 Low-phosphorus fish choices 

Fish is a high-quality protein that contains omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty saltwater fish such as salmon and tuna are highest in omega-3, reducing inflammation and protecting against heart disease and cancer.

Phosphorus content for a 2-ounce portion, cooked:

Mahi Mahi: 104 mg
Tuna, canned: 88 mg

 

Low-phosphorus seafood choices

Seafood is an excellent source of very low-fat, high-quality protein. However, there are differences in varieties of the same species. For example, Pacific oysters contain 50 mg more phosphorus in a 3-ounce serving compared to Eastern oysters.

Phosphorus content for a 3-ounce portion, cooked:

Shrimp: 120 mg
Oysters, Eastern: 120 mg
Snow crab: 120 mg

 Low-phosphorus breads

Bread is a good source of carbohydrates and calories needed by your body fo renergy production. While whole grain bread is a healthy source of fiber, it also has more phosphorus and potassium than white flour bread.

Phosphorus content for a 1-ounce portion, (usually one piece of bread):

Bagel, cinnamon raisin, blueberry, plain, onion, 1 ounce: 53-70 mg Corn tortilla, 6-inch: 75 mg
English muffin, 1 ounce: 52-76 mg Flat bread: 48 mg
Flour tortillas, made without baking powder: 20-37 mg French bread or rolls: 28 mg
Italian bread or rolls: 29 mg Light wheat bread: 38 mg
Pita bread, white: 58 mg Sourdough bread: 30 mg
White bread: 25 mg

 Low-phosphorus pasta and rice

Pasta, rice and other grains are a great source of carbohydrates, calories and B vitamins, plus zinc, copper and iron. For a kidney diet, whole grains like brown rice, oat bran and wild rice ARE LIMITED due to the higher phosphorus content. A half cup of brown rice has 75-81 mg of phosphorus which can add up if you eat a larger portion.

Phosphorus content for a 1/2 cup portion, cooked:

Couscous: 20 mg Egg noodles: 50-60 mg
Macaroni: 40 mg Pearled barley: 43 mg
Plain white rice, short, medium or long grain: 35 mg Rice noodles: 14-28 mg
Spaghetti: 42 mg

 Low-phosphorus dairy, dairy substitutes and egg whites

Milk and milk products are high in calcium and phosphorus, so finding an acceptable lower phosphorus substitute is a must. A half cup of milk (4 ounces) contains 111-138 mg of phosphorus. Some liquid dairy substitutes can be used in cooking to replace milk, but not all products are interchangeable. Read ingredient lists to look for phosphate additives in nondairy products. Some products are fortified with calcium-phosphate. Beware of the ones that promote “high in calcium” as these are also high in phosphorus. Eggs are a great protein source but also contain 95 mg phosphorus in a large egg. Remove the yolk and phosphorus is only 5 mg for each egg white.

Phosphorus content for a 1/2 cup portion, unless stated otherwise:

Almond milk, Almond Breeze®, original: 50 mg Nondairy creamer without phosphate additives: 40-53 mg
Nondairy whipped topping, 2 tablespoons: 0-10 mg Sherbet: 38 mg
Sour cream, 2 tablespoons: 20-40 mg Soy milk varies by brand: 50-125 mg
Unenriched rice milk without calcium-phosphate additives: 29 mg Egg whites, pasteurized 15 mg

 Low-phosphorus snacks

Crackers, cookies, candy, fruits or vegetables — all are appealing snack foods.There are many low-phosphorus choices for your kidney diet.

Apple, 1 medium: 10 mg Applesauce, 1/2 cup: 6 mg
Baby carrots, 9 pieces: 25 mg Biscotti, without chocolate or nuts, 1 ounce: 35-50 mg
Blueberries, 1/2 cup: 9 mg Celery, 1 stalk: 10 mg
Cherries, 1/2 cup: 15 mg Fig bars, 2 bars: 10-25 mg
Fruit candies, hard candy, chews or gummy: 0 mg Fruit cocktail, 1/2 cup: 17 mg
Gelatin, without phosphate additives: 20-30 mg Low sodium crackers, 1 ounce: 20-35 mg
Peach, 1 medium: 10 mg Lemon Juice, 3 fluid ounces: 3.6 mg
Pineapple, fresh, 1/2 cup: 6 mg Radishes, 10: 9 mg
Shortbread cookies, 4 cookies: 17-35 mg Sorbet, 1/2 cup: 2-6 mg
Strawberries, fresh, 1/2 cup: 18 mg Unsalted popcorn, 1 cup: 8 mg
Unsalted pretzels, 1 ounce: 20-40 mg Vanilla wafers, 1 ounce = 5-8 cookies: 12-20 mg

 Lower phosphorus cheese choices

All cheese contains phosphorus with most having 120-250 mg per ounce; some contain more than 300 mg per ounce. The suggested portion for a dialysis diet is usually one ounce of cheese 1-2 times a week if phosphorus is controlled. Check with your dietitian for individual recommendations. Cream cheese-based spreads are much lower in phosphorus than cheese-based spreads. Portion control is key when it comes to cheese!

Low-phosphorus cheese choices:

Blue cheese, 1 ounce: 110 mg Cottage cheese, 1/4 cup: 92 mg
Cream cheese, 2 tablespoons: 20-40 mg Feta cheese, 1 ounce: 96 mg
Neufchatel cheese, 1 ounce: 39 mg Parmesan cheese, grated, 2 tablespoons: 72 mg

 Managing a low-phosphorus diet

Avoid dried fruits which are higher in phosphorus levels including: raisins, prunes, peaches, pears, dates, currants, bananas. Legumes should be reviewed with your dietitian, some are higher in phosphorus and may not be allowed.

FRUITS

Most fruits can be factored at 10 mg phosphorus per serving. Some fruits do not have any phosphorus. Fresh fruits with higher levels of phosphorus can be eaten in moderation. Weigh your food carefully to configure the amount of mg/100g.

GREAT CHOICE, No present phosphorous in fruit; Raspberries, Cherries, Grapefruit, Lychee, Apricots, Pineapple, Plum, Pumpkin

Banana 27 mg; Blackberries 27 mg; Kiwi 71 mg; strawberries 27mg; Tomato 63 mg; Watermelon 26 mg; Mango 23 mg; Orange 18 mg

VEGETABLES

GREAT CHOICE, No present phosphorus in vegetables: Brussel Sprouts, Chicory, Cucumber, Pickles, Leeks, Olives, Radish, Red Paprika,

Asparagus 49 mg: Artichoke 103 mg; Avocado 82 mg; Broccoli 46 mg; Baked Beans 132 mg; Cabbage 36 mg; Carrots 23 mg; Cauliflower 20 mg; Corn 79 mg; Green Beans 26 mg;  Green Peppers 14 mg; Mushrooms 36 mg; Onion 23 mg; Peas 187 mg; Potato 78 mg; Spinach 15 mg; Zucchini 7 mg; Lima Beans 178 mg;

If baking at home, explore substitutes in baking found at DeVita.com. Bakers Active Dry Yeast provides a good solution when baking.  Another TIP to adding levitation is to follow the recipe backwards, eliminate baking powder and salt. Beat the egg whites in a separate bowl until foamy, add a few grains of cream of tarter, beat another 10 seconds. Lastly, fold egg whites into the other ingredients.

Fast Food; Fatty Liver

    How often do you eat “Fast Food in a week’s time?  Is it the best choice, or the easiest way to “Fit A Meal into your day?  Nutrition starts at birth. Life moves forward, “diet” becomes more hectic and evolves from being a way to live, to a way to survive.
     If you are asked to name two questions, routinely raised at any Doctor’s office, most people would correctly respond:
 “Do you drink?”
 “Do you smoke?”
      How often are patients probed to reflect on a daily routine at a yearly check-up with a medical inquiry of, “How many times a week or month do you eat fast food?”  One in five adults are identified with a form of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.  It would stand to reason that if the doctor does not ask the patient about their food intake, the patient should be asking for a analysis of their liver enzymes.
 Recent research studies have proven  “A diet high in FAST FOOD consumption  leads to Liver Disease (Cirrhosis, or Cancer)”.  “Fatty Liver is the most common liver abnormality in children ages 2-9 years old,” revealed in The Office Journal of American Pediatrics      October, 2006.
    Liver disease can only be determined by having liver enzymes evaluated through a blood draw at a yearly check-up. Once diagnosed, recommendation’s will be made and a new dietary routine will be followed by the patient.

      Awareness about the quantity and quality of fast food, saturated with salt and boiling oil,

Fast food leads to Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

slowly kills the liver of adults and children, is the first critical step in re-thinking weekly meal plans  .

     The good news is that a Lifestyle Change improving on:  what is eaten, increased exercise,  avoidance of alcohol and limited sodium intake can return a damaged liver to a healthier state.

Once diagnosed with liver disease, your goal is to help the organ return to it’s normal functions, it’s ability to process everything that you eat and drink. A healthy lifestyle can help you feel your best and help your body cope with it’s disease. By eating


healthy and doing physical activity in moderation you will:

  1. Give your body the energy it needs to work well.
  2. Boost your immune system.
  3. Help your liver renew itself.

                                                         

           Eat Well….Enjoy the Healing Power of Food       Keep your energy level up by eating smaller meals and snacks more often. Organs filled with sodium must be flushed with foods high in Potassium: Sweet Potatoes, Baked Potato; Yogurt; Clams, Halibut; Lima, White and Soy Beans: Prunes, Kiwi, Bananas.

  1. Add, 6-8 glasses of water a day will assist in purifying the body from excess sodium and toxin’s.
  2. Enjoy light to moderate physical activity, such as walking, swimming, gardening
  3. Build up slowly to 30 to 60 minutes of activity, at least 4 times a week.
  4. Avoid food poisoning by storing and preparing foods safely. Wash your hands often.
  5. Talk to your health care provider if depression affects your ability to eat well.

Decrease some of the symptoms and the side effects of any treatments, such as feeling tired and sick by following a healthy diet.

  1. Carbohydrates: Whole grains, fruits and vegetables
  2. Fat: Healthy oils such as: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola oil, Avocado and Smart Balance oils. Omega 3, 6 reduces the inflammation in the liver: Fish, Walnuts, Flaxseed
  3. Protein: Fish (3 x’s / wk), Poultry, Lean Meat

What your body does not need 
1. Avoid alcohol.
2. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Trans Fat must be 0 grams.
3. No more pretzels , chips, popcorn, french fries, cheese, certain meats, soy sauce and Avoid Sports Drinks. Salt, canned and processed foods must be limited.

Tasty fast food can happen in your own kitchen! After reflecting on the latest research consider preparing any of these healthy 7 Easy Recipes under 7 minutes!

Keep in communication with your doctor and dietitian so that neccessary adjustments can be made accordingly to your diet and physical activity plans.

By: K. Crocker

Literature Research
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/4/1388
http://organtransplant.mc.duke.edu/PDFs/Liver_Pre_3.pdf
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17006918&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17047295&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://magazine.wustl.edu/Winter05/SamuelKlein.htm

Fast Food…Cure Liver Disease w Lifestyle Change

If you are asked to name two questions that are routinely raised at any Doctor’s office, most people would correctly respond:
  •  “Do you drink?
  •  “Do you smoke?” 
Even as changes are clearly noted by individual’s with present day increased prices in Health Insurance, how often are patients probed to reflect on a daily routine at a yearly check-up with a medical inquiry of, “How often do you eat fast food?”
 Recent research studies have proven that, A diet high in FAST FOOD consumption  leads to LIVER DISEASE (Cirrhosis, or Cancer)”.  “Fatty liver is the most common liver abnormality in children ages 2-9 years old,” revealed in The Office Journal of American Pediatrics October, 2006.  Liver disease can only be determined by having liver enzymes evaluated through a blood draw at a yearly check-up with ones Doctor.  The good news is that a Lifestyle Change in:  diet,  exercise,  avoidance of alcohollimited sodium intake, and Tea can return a damaged liver to a healthy state.    (Sadly, this is not always the case with liver cancer.)

Once diagnosed with liver disease, your goal is to help the organ return to it’s normal functions, it’s ability to process everything that you eat and drink. A healthy lifestyle can help you feel your best and help your body cope with it’s disease. By eating healthy and doing physical activity in moderation you will:
1. Give your body the energy it needs to work well.
2. Boost your immune system.
3. Help your liver renew itself.

Eat Well
Keep your energy level up by eating smaller meals and snacks more often.  Decrease some of the symptoms and the side effects of any treatments, such as feeling tired and sick by following a healthy diet.

  1. Chew on Fennel Seeds throughout the day (not to exceed 1 tsp!) to unclog the liver. Add Turmeric to your meals . It is become a well known spice in the medicinal world that whose powerful nutrients are known for healing organs.
  2. Carbohydrates(grains, fruits and vegetables)
  3. Fat Healthy oils such as: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola oil, Avocado and Smart Balance oils. Omega 3, 6 reduces the inflammation in the liver: Fish, Walnuts, Flaxseed
  4. Protein: Fish (3 x’s / wk), Poultry, Lean Meat
  5. Salt, canned and processed foods must be limited.
  6. Focus on lower saturated fat choices with each meal.
  7. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluids every day.

     

ENJOY THE HEALING POWER

1. Eat foods high in potassium to offset salt intake. Bananas, Kiwi, apricots, raisins, tomato puree, baked or roasted potatoes, veal and nuts, will all assist in ridding the body of excess sodium.
2. Enjoy light to moderate physical activity, such as walking, swimming, gardening

3.Build up slowly to 30 to 60 minutes of activity, at least 4 times a week.
4. Avoid food poisoning by storing and preparing foods safely. Wash your hands often.
5. Talk to your health care provider if depression affects your ability to eat well.

What your body does not need
1. Avoid alcohol.
2. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Trans Fat must be 0 grams.
3. Reduce Sodium intake!  No more pretzels , chips, popcorn, french fries, cheese, certain meats, soy sauce and Avoid Sports Drinks.
                                 

Keep in communication with your doctor and dietitian so that neccessary adjustments can be made accordingly to your diet and physical activity plans.

By: K. Crocker

Literature Research

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/4/1388
http://organtransplant.mc.duke.edu/PDFs/Liver_Pre_3.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17006918&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17047295&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://magazine.wustl.edu/Winter05/SamuelKlein.htm