Dietary Serving Guidelines

Dietary Serving Guidelines

The Pyramid Diet
This is the diet developed by the USDA to satisfy the nutritional requirements of most Americans.

Servings Defined:

Fruits and Vegetables 1/2 cup = 1 Serving

Fats/ Oils 1 tbsp = 1 Serving

Meat, Fish, Poultry 4-6 oz = 1 Serving

Glass of Milk or Water 8 oz =1 Serving

Juice 4 oz= 1 Serving

Recommended Daily Nutritional Intake

0-3 servings (use sparingly) fats, oils, sweets
2-3 servings (6 – 9 ounces) meat/protein
2-3 servings dairy
2-4 servings fruit
3-5 servings vegetables
6-11 servings bread/starch

Fluids are equally important to a successful diet. Add 1-2 glasses of water with 1/2 to 1 whole lemon each day. Also drink 1-2 cups of Oolong tea each day. Oolong tea burns over 157% more fat than Green Tea and has become the most popular tea designed to accelerate weigh loss.

In order to lose weight, you must take in fewer calories than you burn off each day. According to the USDA pamphlet, a sedentary woman and older people may only expend 1600 calories per day, while active men and very active women may burn 2800 calories per day – twice as much.
If your goal is to lose weight and you do not see changes just with increased physical activity, then reducing portions and servings may help, while still using the pyramid as a guide.

1200 Calorie Diet
6 oz. lean meat/protein
5 servings bread/starch
3 servings fruit
4 or more servings vegetables
2 servings dairy (low fat preferred)
3 servings fat

1500 Calorie Diet
6 oz. lean meat/protein
6 servings bread/starch
4 servings fruit
5 or more servings vegetables
2 servings dairy (low fat preferred)
3 servings fat

Daily Serving Logs
A key to losing wait and monitoring food intake is simple by keeping a Food Journal in which you write and mark your servings as you eat throughout each day.

Note: These diets are weight management tools for normally healthy adults. Consult with your medical provider to see if a reduced calorie diet is appropriate for your health before you change your diet. People with diabetes, pregnant women, children under 16, and those with an eating disorder are strongly cautioned to seek medical advice before modifying their diet. A registered dietitian is your best resource to counsel you on how to modify your diet for the best individual results. In the US, you can locate a dietitian through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

A special thank you to the USDA and for the links and information used on this blog.